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iTeach Instructional Resources



2005-2006 Scholarship of Teaching Series


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Spring 2006

Dates

Title

Speaker

May 16, 2006
Learning Communities: Establishing a Successful Path for First Year Students.

Jean Henscheid is a fellow with the National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition, managing editor of About Campus , and teaches interdisciplinary general education courses for first-year students at the University of Idaho . As a fellow, she conducts program evaluations for first-year initiatives, including learning communities, first-year seminars, general education curricula, teaching with new technologies, and peer instruction. She also facilitates workshops on issues related to first-year students and serves as a reviewer for the Journal of the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition . As managing editor of About Campus, she works with authors writing on the enhancement of college student learning. Her monograph, Integrating the First-Year Experience: The Role of First-Year Seminars in Learning Communities , was released in 2004 from the National Resource Center . She also serves as a faculty member at the National Learning Communities Summer Institute at The Evergreen State College, has authored book chapters and articles on various topics related to the college student experience, authored a monograph on senior capstone courses, and co-authored a primer on conducting research on the college student experience. Prior to coming to the National Resource Center, Dr. Henscheid led learning community programs as well taught undergraduate and graduate courses in leadership and research methods at Washington State University .
Dr. Jean Henscheid,
English Department, University of Idaho,
Moscow Fellow with the National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition
May 9th, 2006
Developing Inclusive Pedagogics in a Diverse Learning Environment

The issue of diversity is an important point of interest to students as the average 18-22 year-old is in a stage of development where cultural and value orientation is being established. The university provides a rich learning environment where students can greatly benefit from the diversity of cultures and ideas. The Panel Discussion will focus on:

  • Understanding the diversity in the classroom and how it can serve as a catalyst for intellectual and emotional growth, both for the instructor and the student
  • New approaches that faculty can utilize to reach the students more effectively
  • How faculty can create a learning environment where differences are embraced and fostered
  • How faculty can effectively work with students who have varying learning styles
  • Programmatic initiatives to support undergraduate retention, particularly underrepresented minorities, that have an interest in pursuing graduate education in medicine or M.S./Ph.D. programs
  • Programmatic initiatives to improve academic advising on campus

Dr. Yolanda Moses
Associate Vice Provost-Conflict Resolution,

Dr. Jennifer Bloom

Associate Dean for Student Affairs and the Medical Scholars Program (MSP) at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Urbana-Champaign

Dr. Neal Schiller

Associate Dean, UCR/UCLA Thomas Haider Program in Biomedical Sciences

Dr. John Wills

School of Education

Dr. Adalberto Aguirre

Dept. of Sociology
April 12, 2006
Academic Integrity: Teaching & Learning to Create a Culture of Honor

A Panel discussion that explores how Academic Integrity is viewed by the campus community and shares ideas for best practice approaches to create a culture of honor.
Dr. Gary Scott
Associate Dean CNAS

Susan Allen Ortega
Dean of Students-Student Affairs

Dr. June O'Connor
Religious Studies

Kris Miller
Computer Science

Brian Linard
Computer Science

Ming Yang
Computing & Communications
April 6, 2006
Recent Advances on How the Brain Learns, and the Implications for Teaching Science and Almost Everything.

Research findings over the past two decades have revealed that the brain has multiple memory systems that learn and store information differently. Unknowingly, most teachers direct learning into the wrong memory systems by the instructional and assessment approaches that they use. Equally unfortunate is that most students study in ways that misdirect learning into the wrong memory systems or that simply lead to rapid memory loss of the information. Dr. Walker will summarize some of the relevant research findings and then discuss how common forms of teaching or studying can enhance learning or confound it. Most of the examples will focus on teaching and learning in the sciences.

Dr. Dan Walker,
Professor of Biology and Science Education
College of Science, San Jose State University
Winter 2006

Dates

Title

Speaker

February 15, 2006
Using iLearn to Enhance Student Learning

A faculty panel discussion exploring uses for iLearn: A workshop designed to help instructors successfully utilize iLearn to present their course materials and promote student engagement.
Dr. Helen Henry
Biomedical Sciences

Dr. Eugene Nothnagle
Botany

Dr. Juliette Levy
History

Dr. Roger Ransom
History

Dr. Leo Schouest
Manager Faculty & Student Technical Support
Computing & Communications
January 31, 2006 Utilization of Personal Response Clickers in the Classroom - A Faculty Panel Discussion

This workshop is designed to help instructors successfully utilize clickers to increase student engagement by providing a way to pose questions to students, aggregate student responses immediately, and associate student responses to individual students. A panel of faculty will share their experiences in utilizing the technology. Participants will be presented a session that explores:
  • Best practices for the use the personal response clickers in the classroom
  • Issues related to the use of clickers
  • Outcomes of using clickers
  • Support structure of the campus regarding clickers.
Dr. Curt Burgess
Psychology

Dr. Michael Erickson
Psychology

Dr. Robert Hanneman
Sociology

Dr. Keith Hollis
Chemistry

Dr. Justin McDaniel
Religious Studies

Dr. Leo Schouest
Manager Faculty & Student Technical Support
Computing & Communications
Fall 2005

Dates

Title

Speaker

December 29, 2005
Strategies for Teaching Large Classes

An introduction to teaching strategies for large classes drawing from published and on-line resources, as well as Dr. Rosenblum's experience. He will provide suggestions for effective lecturing style and appropriate use of new technologies. The workshop is intended to facilitate a discussion of the attendees' own experiences in teaching large classes. By sharing problems and solutions the attendees will learn from faculties across the disciplines with the ultimate goal of improving teaching techniques.
Dr. Lawrence Rosenblum
Psychology
December 14, 2005
Utilization of Personal Response Clickers in the Classroom

This workshop is designed to help instructors successfully utilize clickers to increase student engagement by providing a way to pose questions to students, aggregate student responses immediately, and associate student responses to individual students.
Dr. Leo Schouest
Manager Faculty & Student Technical Support
Computing & Communications


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